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For artists we provide a platform for extensive presentation of media works, gallerists get a direct contact to international professional audiences, collectors find a worldwide overview of contemporary trends in moving image, curators can do research via keywords and compilations, teachers use presentation opportunities for students and all professionals get password protected, extensive information about video works worldwide.

64th International Short Film Festival Oberhausen 2018

In the course of more than five decades, the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen has become one of the world's most respected film events and in its 64th issue over 500 films were shown selected out of more than 7.000 films submitted.

Videoart at High Noon
Critics‘ Pick by Nicole Büsing and Heiko Klaas

Cologne/Brussels. How can video art be presented in a suitable way? While on “blinkvideo” you can enjoy watching video art comfortably from your couch, at your desk or on a train, viewing videos at art fairs often turns out to be quite a challenge. To concentrate on a work of moving pictures in the bustling atmosphere of an art fair requires maximum attention. And yet, this year’s Art Cologne and the simultaneous Art Brussels once more featured a number of intriguing video works, some of which we would like to present you here.

Christoph Faulhaber: Revolution & Architecture

Kunsthalle Osnabrück / June 15 to October 2, 2018
With "Revolution & Architecture" Christoph Faulhaber (* 1972 in Osnabrück, lives in Hamburg) conceives, builds, designs and opens a whole series of very different rooms in the Kunsthalle Osnabrück. In order to discover the revolutionary aspect of these "architectures", one has to look at the social implications of interior design in general. In the forum the visitor then enters Faulhaber's cinematic autobiography "Every Picture is an Empty Picture" as in the eye of the cyclone: The work is split into 15 individual films and surrounds the visitor in a circle.

European Media Art Festival 2018

The various sections of the festival dealt primarily with one theme: the link between media art and journalism – under the heading “Report – Notes from Reality.” It was all about facebook data theft, interference in elections by secret services, the threat of trade war, and dubious arms exports.

Johan Grimonprez

Johan Grimonprez’s critically acclaimed work dances on the borders of practice and theory, art and cinema, documentary and fiction, demanding a double take on the part of the viewer. Informed by an archeology of present-day media, his work seeks out the tension between the intimate and the bigger picture of globalization. It questions our contemporary sublime, one framed by a fear industry that has infected political and social dialogue. By suggesting new narratives through which to tell a story, his work emphasizes a multiplicity of realities.
image: © Johan Griminprez

Breaking News
Von Kelterborn Collection

Over the past 20 years, the Frankfurt couple Mario and Julia von Kelterborn have put together a collection mostly of politically explosive, socially themed video art and photography by internationally known artists. It is their conviction that art can help us to understand the present day with all its complexity, contradictions and disturbing cruelty, but also its positive potential.

image: © Richard Mosse

Featured videos

B3 – ON DESIRE

With the key topic ON DESIRE, B3 will in fall 2017 reflect on the latest trends relating to the moving image in art and media from a political, technological and aesthetic perspective. Desire as yearning, wish, lust or hope and its translation into moving images will be explored in an artistic, social, political, sociopolitical and historical perspective and critically examined. . . .

image: Jesper Just, Servitudes (2015)

KINO DER KUNST

2017 a worldwide unique combination of film festival and art exhibition, held its third edition in April 2017. Movie theatres and museums all over Munich presented an International Competition as well as special focuses, artists talks, smposions and multi-channel installations.

Stiftung imai – inter media art institute

The Düsseldorf based foundation imai – inter media art institute was founded in 2006 in order to establish an institution in Germany dedicated to the distribution and preservation of media art and associated activities.

Artemovendo – in collaboration with Goethe Institut Porto Alegre

The video works shown in Artemovendo present a morphology of ambiguous entities, creatures or technical devices. Natural environments are contrasted with artificial, fully computer-designed worlds. Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish whether we have been invited to take a look at the outside world or into a laboratory; even dimensions appear to be chosen arbitrarily. Or do we happen to be entering a microscopically small universe that has been magnified many times over?

Anna Gaskell. Hide and Seek

Curated by Nadia Ismail

The Kunsthalle Gießen is pleased to present the first institutional solo-exhibition in Germany by the New York based artist Anna Gaskell (*1969 Des Moines/Iowa). The exhibition focuses on photographic and time-based works which have largely characterised the American artists Œuvre since 1996.

Duration: 27.01. - 08.04.2018

image: © Anna Gaskell and Light Manufacturing/Esto, Courtesy: Galerie Gisela Capitain, Köln

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blinkvideo is a website for the research of video art. Founders: Julia Sökeland, Anita Beckers. blinkvideo ist eine Plattform zur Recherche nach Videokunst

64th International Short Film Festival
Oberhausen 2018

Works

In the course of more than five decades, the International Short Film Festival Oberhausen has become one of the world's most respected film events and in its 64th issue over 500 films were shown selected out of more than 7.000 films submitted.

On blinkvideo you can watch a selection of the following films:

Dimitri Venkov won the e-flux and the award of the international Critics for his film Gimny Moskovii (The Hymns of Moscovy). The jury Statement of the jury: The aesthetic framing of this film flips both history and space to render a vision of a metropolis that is not only visually and sonically spectacular, but truly intergalactic.

The film Hirografo (Manuscript) by Eva Stefani that was selected for the Principal Price was mentioned as a derive through Athens weaves, a singular and atmospheric vision of the city. This contemporary fable makes exceptional use of both archival footage and subtle poetic wit.

"Lynne Sachs’ Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor is an 8-minute triptych of brief encounters with Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, and Gunvor Nelson filmed at the artists’ homes or studios.

BIGGER THAN LIFE by Adnan Softić is a music film in four acts. The focus is on the fabrication of national history through architecture and urban planning. He won the 3Sat Price who certified him a sure sense of pathos and breaks.

Marian Mayland with her film - A bar on Majorca (Eine Kneipe auf Malle) won the NRW price for a multi-layered essay that reflects social, political and populist upheavals by no means as harmless as its title.

And last not least Julia Weißenberg’s film Hallstatt Experience, based on video recordings from the Austrian Hallstatt and the Chinese copy of the same name, located in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong.

64th International Short Film Festival Oberhausen 2018

Lynne Sachs
Carolee, Barbara & Gunvor

Artist Lynne Sachs
Year 2018
Duration 8:38 min
Technical info Super 8 and 16mm transferred to digital, special excerpt created for blinkvideo
Contact

For further information contact blinkvideo
Phone: +49 172 4024342
E-Mail: info@blinkvideo.de

About the video

Three renowned women artists discuss their passion for filmmaking. From 2015 to 2017, Lynne visited with Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer and Gunvor Nelson, three multi-faceted artists who have embraced the moving image throughout their lives. From Carolee’s 18th Century house in the woods of Upstate New York to Barbara’s West Village studio to Gunvor’s childhood village in Sweden, Lynne shoots film with each woman in the place where she finds grounding and spark.

Screen Slate 2/22/18 Review by Tyler Maxin

"Lynne Sachs’ Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor is an 8-minute triptych of brief encounters with Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, and Gunvor Nelson filmed at the artists’ homes or studios. Sachs has a really well-attuned photographic eye, and she captures the trio in a series of easygoing domestic situations. The three artists discuss their artistic lives, how they came into their practice, how their gender identities factor in, where their work comes from. It’s a simple premise with intimate results, especially good at giving a sense of the artists’ environments. " (Tyler Maxin)

Village Voice 2/16/18 Review by Ela Bittencourt

“I could make the inside of myself show on the outside,” Barbara Hammer says in Lynne Sachs’s documentary Carolee, Barbara & Gunvor (2018), explaining how a lighter movie camera, developed in the Sixties, helped her convey intimacy, and thus became a useful, malleable tool of expression. The short, in which Sachs pays a visit to pioneering women artists who used moving image in their practice — Hammer, Carolee Schneemann, Gunvor Nelson — will enjoy a weeklong run as part of “Doc Fortnight,” the Museum of Modern Art’s annual showcase dedicated to nonfiction film. (Ela Bittencourt)

Brooklyn Rail 4/4/18 Review by

https://brooklynrail.org/2018/04/artseen/JEFFREY-PERKINS-George  

A similarly brief and similarly enchanting encounter followed with the world premiere screening of Carolee, Barbara, and Gunvor, (2018) Lynne Sachs’s nine-minute cinematic collage exploring the distinctive styles and approaches of three artists. She delicately weaves them together by positioning them each in a place of familiarity and inner personal power to themselves and their work. Schneemann interacts with a film camera as a prop which becomes an inducer of memories in her Hudson Valley home; documentary maker Barbara Hammer moves around various sources of inspiration in her West Village studio and Gunvor Nelson shares glimpses of the village where she spent her childhood in Sweden. Each artist is gracefully and uniquely introduced via different relationships they have created with themselves, their environments, the filmmaker, and the audience.

agnès films: Supporting Women and Feminist Filmmakers 4/5/2018 Review by Julia Casper Roth

It was deep into her artistic practice that Lynne Sachs shifted to a collaborative style of filmmaking. As she recounts on her website, Sachs was in the midst of recording a project when it struck her that those in front of the camera were performing. Aware that such hyperbolic displays might betray the authenticity of her subjects, Sachs invited the subjects to participate with her. No longer was her process about filming and being filmed. Rather, filmmaking became a joint effort that softened the camera as an intermediary and aloof barrier.

It’s this approach to filmmaking that makes Sachs’ most recent work, Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor, such a particularly wonderful piece. The short film doesn’t expose the stories of just any subjects; it looks at the lives of three creative giants who work with the moving image: Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, and Gunvor Nelson. With filmmakers balancing out both sides of the lens, the collaboration between filmmaker and subject reaches superheroine proportions.

Shot on 8mm and 16mm film, the soft colors and square aspect ratio of the film pull the viewer out of contemporary times. In the first image of the film, a cat is perched on a tree limb. In the next, the cat is acting as sentinel on a porch. The camera looks from the inside of a house out, framing the cat in a doorway. This moment jars me. I hear the voice of Schneemann discussing her entry into the medium of moving images, but the picture quality, the cat, the framing—it all conjures images of Schneemann’s own Fuses. For a moment, I wonder if I’m actually looking at Schneemann’s footage, but the tell-tale painted film frames, frenetic cuts, and abstraction of her work are absent.

Sachs’ camera casually captures mundane moments at Schneemann’s upstate New York home with beautiful, compositional precision. Schneemann describes moments ranging from her first experience with a Bolex camera to her desire to film the ordinariness of light coming through a hospital window. While she describes it, Sachs captures the sentiment; Schneeman is seen talking on the phone, hanging laundry, looking at mail. Sachs also prioritizes otherwise subtle images in and around the home: a dead bird on the porch, light coming through the window, and shots of greenery around the yard. In this piece, collaboration comes in the form of homage and interpretation.

Next, the film moves to the voice and image of Barbara Hammer. Of the film’s three subjects, Hammer is perhaps the most performative of the bunch. In a compositionally stunning scene, Hammer, at turns, walks and jogs the length of an iron fence in New York’s West Village. She repeats this several times, her body mingling with the long shadows cast by the iron slats. Eventually, she addresses the presence of Sachs’ camera. She stops, stares into it—challenges it—until Sachs pulls the camera skyward. A moment later, Hammer is on the ground, bathed in the fence’s shadows and smiling. Accompanying these images is Hammer’s forever youthful voice, explaining her love of performance both with and without her camera.

From here, the viewer moves into Hammer’s studio space to watch her toy with window blinds and choreograph film cameras as she slides them across her table. She discusses identity, and that discussion is punctuated with another challenge to Sachs’ camera; Hammer points the lens of a camera right back at her.

The final section of the triad takes the viewer to a montage of images that focus on the natural: flowers, ducks, a pond, and landscape greenery. There is no audio soundtrack for the first portion of this section: no music and no narration. The faintest sound of birds in the distant background can be missed unless the volume is set to high. Finally, the voice of Gunvor Nelson cuts the silence. It joins the images, describing Nelson’s entry into film and her impending exit from it as well. The images in this section of the film seem crisper, perhaps to reflect the camera Nelson holds in her hands—a digital Nikon. As Nelson and her camera interact with flowers and landscape, Sachs’ camera watches. Eventually, the two artists end up lens to lens, looking down a barrel at one another’s craft.

Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor is an exquisite dance shared by filmmakers and their literal and metaphorical lenses. It’s also a wonderful journey of nostalgia. The look of the 8mm and 16mm film paired with the subject matter easily takes the viewer back to the innovative first moments of women’s experimental filmmaking.


Credits

Featuring Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, Gunvor Nelson

Directed by Lynne Sachs

Lynne Sachs - Carolee, Barbara & Gunvor
Three renowned women artists discuss their passion for filmmaking. From 2015 to 2017, Lynne visited with Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer and Gunvor Nelson, three multi-faceted artists who have embraced the moving image throughout their lives. From Carolee’s 18th Century house in the woods of Upstate New York to Barbara’s West Village studio to Gunvor’s childhood village in Sweden, Lynne shoots film with each woman in the place where she finds grounding and spark.Screen Slate 2/22/18 Review by Tyler Maxin Lynne Sachs’ Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor is an 8-minute triptych of brief encounters with Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, and Gunvor Nelson filmed at the artists’ homes or studios. Sachs has a really well-attuned photographic eye, and she captures the trio in a series of easygoing domestic situations. The three artists discuss their artistic lives, how they came into their practice, how their gender identities factor in, where their work comes from. It’s a simple premise with intimate results, especially good at giving a sense of the artists’ environments. (Tyler Maxin)Village Voice 2/16/18 Review by Ela Bittencourt “I could make the inside of myself show on the outside,” Barbara Hammer says in Lynne Sachs’s documentary Carolee, Barbara & Gunvor (2018), explaining how a lighter movie camera, developed in the Sixties, helped her convey intimacy, and thus became a useful, malleable tool of expression. The short, in which Sachs pays a visit to pioneering women artists who used moving image in their practice — Hammer, Carolee Schneemann, Gunvor Nelson — will enjoy a weeklong run as part of “Doc Fortnight,” the Museum of Modern Art’s annual showcase dedicated to nonfiction film. (Ela Bittencourt)Brooklyn Rail 4/4/18 Review by https://brooklynrail.org/2018/04/artseen/JEFFREY-PERKINS-George   A similarly brief and similarly enchanting encounter followed with the world premiere screening of Carolee, Barbara, and Gunvor, (2018) Lynne Sachs’s nine-minute cinematic collage exploring the distinctive styles and approaches of three artists. She delicately weaves them together by positioning them each in a place of familiarity and inner personal power to themselves and their work. Schneemann interacts with a film camera as a prop which becomes an inducer of memories in her Hudson Valley home; documentary maker Barbara Hammer moves around various sources of inspiration in her West Village studio and Gunvor Nelson shares glimpses of the village where she spent her childhood in Sweden. Each artist is gracefully and uniquely introduced via different relationships they have created with themselves, their environments, the filmmaker, and the audience.agnès films: Supporting Women and Feminist Filmmakers 4/5/2018 Review by Julia Casper Roth It was deep into her artistic practice that Lynne Sachs shifted to a collaborative style of filmmaking. As she recounts on her website, Sachs was in the midst of recording a project when it struck her that those in front of the camera were performing. Aware that such hyperbolic displays might betray the authenticity of her subjects, Sachs invited the subjects to participate with her. No longer was her process about filming and being filmed. Rather, filmmaking became a joint effort that softened the camera as an intermediary and aloof barrier.It’s this approach to filmmaking that makes Sachs’ most recent work, Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor, such a particularly wonderful piece. The short film doesn’t expose the stories of just any subjects; it looks at the lives of three creative giants who work with the moving image: Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Hammer, and Gunvor Nelson. With filmmakers balancing out both sides of the lens, the collaboration between filmmaker and subject reaches superheroine proportions.Shot on 8mm and 16mm film, the soft colors and square aspect ratio of the film pull the viewer out of contemporary times. In the first image of the film, a cat is perched on a tree limb. In the next, the cat is acting as sentinel on a porch. The camera looks from the inside of a house out, framing the cat in a doorway. This moment jars me. I hear the voice of Schneemann discussing her entry into the medium of moving images, but the picture quality, the cat, the framing—it all conjures images of Schneemann’s own Fuses. For a moment, I wonder if I’m actually looking at Schneemann’s footage, but the tell-tale painted film frames, frenetic cuts, and abstraction of her work are absent.Sachs’ camera casually captures mundane moments at Schneemann’s upstate New York home with beautiful, compositional precision. Schneemann describes moments ranging from her first experience with a Bolex camera to her desire to film the ordinariness of light coming through a hospital window. While she describes it, Sachs captures the sentiment; Schneeman is seen talking on the phone, hanging laundry, looking at mail. Sachs also prioritizes otherwise subtle images in and around the home: a dead bird on the porch, light coming through the window, and shots of greenery around the yard. In this piece, collaboration comes in the form of homage and interpretation.Next, the film moves to the voice and image of Barbara Hammer. Of the film’s three subjects, Hammer is perhaps the most performative of the bunch. In a compositionally stunning scene, Hammer, at turns, walks and jogs the length of an iron fence in New York’s West Village. She repeats this several times, her body mingling with the long shadows cast by the iron slats. Eventually, she addresses the presence of Sachs’ camera. She stops, stares into it—challenges it—until Sachs pulls the camera skyward. A moment later, Hammer is on the ground, bathed in the fence’s shadows and smiling. Accompanying these images is Hammer’s forever youthful voice, explaining her love of performance both with and without her camera.From here, the viewer moves into Hammer’s studio space to watch her toy with window blinds and choreograph film cameras as she slides them across her table. She discusses identity, and that discussion is punctuated with another challenge to Sachs’ camera; Hammer points the lens of a camera right back at her.The final section of the triad takes the viewer to a montage of images that focus on the natural: flowers, ducks, a pond, and landscape greenery. There is no audio soundtrack for the first portion of this section: no music and no narration. The faintest sound of birds in the distant background can be missed unless the volume is set to high. Finally, the voice of Gunvor Nelson cuts the silence. It joins the images, describing Nelson’s entry into film and her impending exit from it as well. The images in this section of the film seem crisper, perhaps to reflect the camera Nelson holds in her hands—a digital Nikon. As Nelson and her camera interact with flowers and landscape, Sachs’ camera watches. Eventually, the two artists end up lens to lens, looking down a barrel at one another’s craft.Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor is an exquisite dance shared by filmmakers and their literal and metaphorical lenses. It’s also a wonderful journey of nostalgia. The look of the 8mm and 16mm film paired with the subject matter easily takes the viewer back to the innovative first moments of women’s experimental filmmaking.

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